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Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout

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Egyptian, Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

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Egyptian, Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

mh_1910_9_4_a_k_v3-cdm.jpg

Egyptian, Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

mh_1910_9_4_a_k_v4-cdm.jpg

Egyptian, Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

On View
Unknown
Egyptian
Place made: 
Africa; Egypt
Shabti of the Divine Adoratress Kedmerout, 945-712 BCE (Third Intermediate Period, Dynasty 22)
Faience; molded with pigments
Overall: 4 1/4 in x 1 3/8 in x 2 1/16 in; 10.8 cm x 3.5 cm x 5.2 cm
Gift of the Egypt Exploration Fund
MH 1910.9.4.A.K

Ancient Egyptians were obliged to perform certain tasks for the state, including agricultural labor. Small mummy-shaped figurines called “shabtis” were introduced to perform this work in the afterlife and often carried hoes or seed-baskets. Initially, the deceased was given only one shabti, but the number increased dramatically over time. From the 18th Dynasty on, shabtis sometimes appeared dressed as living people rather than as mummies. These statuettes could be made of earthenware, Egyptian faience, stone, or other materials. Egyptian faience, a ceramic substance composed of quartz granules fused with alkali, frequently appears in bright colors that imitate lapis lazuli or turquoise.

2016