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African American Artists and the Experimental Printmaking Institute

The Janet Hickey Tague '66 Collection

August 10, 2012 Through December 23, 2012
In the Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

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Joseph Holston (American, b. 1944), Man in Boat, 2005
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

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David Driskell (American, b. 1931), Thelma Festival II, 2006
Photo Credit: 

Petegorsky/Gipe

epi_large_mh_2007_7_9_v1-lpr.jpg

Man in Boat, 2005

Joseph Holston (American, b. 1944)
Color etching
MH 2007.7.9

Joseph Holston (American, b. 1944), Man in Boat, 2005

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Thelma Festival II, 2006

David Driskell (American, b. 1931)
Mono print, relief
MH 2007.7.6

David Driskell (American, b. 1931), Thelma Festival II, 2006

This exhibition features a selection of outstanding works on paper by prominent African American artists, all produced at the acclaimed Experimental Printmaking Institute (EPI) at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. On view are a range of printmaking processes including serigraphs, relief prints, color etchings, and lithographs by eight internationally renowned artists: Emma Amos, David C. Driskell, Melvin Edwards, Sam Gilliam, Robin Holder, Joseph Holston, Curlee Raven Holton, and Faith Ringgold.

These important works were generously donated to the Museum in 2007-2008 by Janet Hickey Tague ’66, former Mount Holyoke College Trustee and long-time EPI supporter, thereby establishing the Tague collection of prints by African American artists. This gift of 17 prints significantly enhanced the Museum’s holdings in this area and was an important step in Mount Holyoke’s efforts to acquire key works by artists of color.

Under the direction of founder and master printer Professor Curlee Raven Holton, the Experimental Printmaking Institute has become known for its dynamic and collaborative approach allowing artists, students, and printers from diverse backgrounds to experiment with traditional printmaking techniques and to create new bodies of work. Holton established EPI in 1996 “as a way to create a living classroom that embraces diversity, creativity, and collaboration.” Over the years, the Institute has generated works of art that have been showcased internationally in traveling exhibitions and now figure prominently in collections worldwide.